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Cracks in the Swedish opposition coalition as the Green Party refuses to endorse social democrats leader, Hakan Juholt

Thursday, 15 December 2011
The Swedish Green Party has refused to decide who the party wants to see as Prime Minister, within their own bloc, thereby refusing to endorse the leader of the biggest political party in Sweden – the Social Democrats.

In the 2010 election campaign the Green Party was in what became known as the Red-Green coalition and threw their support to Mona Sahlin as their Prime Ministerial candidate. But today that cooperation is becoming history and the Green Party spokesperson, Gustav Fridolin refuses to provide information on who the party want to support – current prime minister, Fredrik Reinfeldt, or opposition leader Hakan Juholt.

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"No, we do not have any position on the Prime Minister issue. Our mission is to grow so that we become a stronger force before the next election. We’ll build your own powerful alternative to the government, "said Gustav Fridolin according to media reports.

The Green Party made a record gains on the polls last year and is now focusing on becoming so large party that will be taken seriously in the future government formation.
The Prime Ministerial issue will come back all the way up to the next election. But it is three years away. “As we approach 2014, we will provide notice of the Prime Ministerial question and it will relate to how the political landscape looks like then, "Says Gustav Fridolin.

The Green Party has put up a new strategy that plays down the questions that may scare away voters. Shorter working hours is one such issue. Instead, the party is to focus on fighting unemployment with green solutions according to reports.

It should be noted that support for the social democrat party has been falling like a rock and it is believe that the fall is driven by the weak popularity of the social democrat leader Hakan Juholt.
By Scancomark.se Team


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