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Swedish Premier Reinfeldt looks at the long term effect of the Euro crisis on Sweden as he clashed in the parliament with the opposition

Wednesday, 18 January 2012
Europe is in a simultaneous financial crisis, debt crisis and the crisis of confidence which will also affect the Swedish economy for many years. This is the view of the Swedish Prime Minister, Fredrik Reinfeldt at the parliamentary party leaders’ debate on Wednesday in the Swedish parliament.

"Our continent, our Europe is in a financial crisis of debt crisis and the crisis of confidence, "he said, pointing out that even in the major countries in Europe such as Germany, Britain and France there has been growing increased national debt.

He said that means Europe for many years to come needs to adopt policies to reduce these debts and that this will affect an exporting country such as Sweden.
"It will ultimately affect the Swedish economy, Swedish households and Swedish job, "said the Prime Minister.

He said that our economy is not large enough to reverse the situation, although it is gratifying that the Swedish economy is doing better than most.
Fredrik Reinfeldt said also that more people now come closer to the labour market than when the alliance government took office in 2006.

According to the Prime Minister four things now pretty important namely: to be able to influence developments in Europe, "do not connect Sweden to the debt crisis, but Sweden should not be separated from the other," protecting our working line and focus on incentives to work and for the fourth to focus on cohesion in difficult times.

He said the government "has stood up to make it worthwhile to work and we can also see it more as a result of our efforts," adding that it is also important to invest in them with little margin so as to hold Sweden together.

"The best way to achieve this is through own hard work, "according to Fredrik Reinfeldt.
He also said that "there is no united opposition in Sweden" now.

"None of the individual parties have suggestions on how to take responsibility for Sweden ... the only thing the opposition does is to carry out high pitch, often replacing the lack of proposals. So is the situation today, "said the Prime Minister.

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He noted that "the Swedish Left" today are discussing that working hours fall when it is supposed to increase.
Social Democratic party leader Håkan Juholt asked in his reply, and ask the Prime Minister's who has given the government a mandate to "sell out, Sale out" schools, clinics, libraries and so on.
"You sell out Sweden without a civic support for this, "he said.

Fredrik Reinfeldt said that "the love of the high tone" obscure facts.
"Your true facts don’t exist. Most of the public sector is driven by local actors, "he said and asked what the Social Democratic alternative looks like.

Green Party spokesperson Gustav Fridolin criticized the government for doing too little for the young unemployed.
The Prime Minister replied that the Government is "replacing Goran Persson's school with Jan Björklund's school", in which more success is going through improved performances from elementary school with passing grades. This has introduced vocational and increase the thresholds for young people to enter the labour market.

"What strikes me when I listen to the Prime Minister is whether he really understands people's concerns, "said Jimmie Åkesson of the Swedish Democrats, the far right party.

Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said that Sweden "is the exception" in Europe, one of the few countries that do not face major cuts and "massive tax increases." How wonders how this can be justified after saying that Sweden would suffer from the effects of the economic crisis and that Sweden is a smaller country and cannot protect its self properly from the weakening euro market.

The Left Party's new leader, Jonas Sjöstedt said that "if you had had what you wanted, we would have had the euro today," and likely higher unemployment and lower economic growth.
"Why can you not respect the Swedish people who said “no” to the euro in the referendum? "He asked likely referring to the interest of the government to back the pact which is seen here as a backdoor to adopting the Euro single currency. As such the Left Party leader urged the government to say “no” to the euro area's fiscal pact.

Fredrik Reinfeldt said that he believes that it is possible to obtain a solution which respects the Swedish people’s “no” to the euro, but still have a voice in the EU.

"It does not matter what the Left Party leader called, but you always attack the budget discipline, "said Fredrik Reinfeldt.
By Scancomark.se Team



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