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British government  determined to purge immigration despite pressures from companies
Tuesday, 23 November 2010
The British coalition government has agreed to put a cap on the number of immigrants from non-EU countries that would be allowed to immigrate into the country. The Home Secretary, Theresa May will announce to the British MPs later today that only about 43,000 skilled non EU immigrants would be allowed into the country from next, down 13 percent on 2009, reports various British media sources.

Worker transferred by their companies from another country will be exempt if their salary is more than £40,000 a year. But hard hit are students from non EU countries. They pay the highest amount in School fees and other expenses and have been hailed in the past for contributing billions of pounds into the UK treasury but the current British government still think they should be curbed. But the non-degree level students coming to the UK would be affected.
Many non EU migrants who come to the country as student end up working in the dark economy, exploited by shady employers while some work as prostitute. Various documentaries and investigative journalism has show how companies such as dress makers exploit these students –many of whom come from poor former British colonies. A channel 4 documentary recently show how some of these supposedly university students work for cloth producers in the Midlands in the UK for almost no salary and not taxes paid to the state.  It just goes on the highlight the shambolic nature of the British labour market which the coalition government must correct if the country has to improve on tax takings,

Another area of contention is among Universities. They have been collecting huge amount of taking in the form of tuition from over sea students. A curb in their numbers as well as government’s cut in university funding would surely affect one of their major sources of income.

The cap on immigration is not a new thing. During the last general election campaign, Conservative party leader, David Cameron, pledged to cap immigration levels, in what he sad that the British immigration system had failed. Liberal Democrat leader and the current vice Prime Minister Nick Clegg said that policy ignored the fact that most immigration came from the EU.
Next year further designs will be carried out to curb the amount of family members who join their relatives already here.

The crux of the matter is that most of the bulk of immigrants to the UK comes from former Ester Europe or those countries which joined the EU in the 2000s. At that time there was great debate whether to allow them to have free access to the British labour market. Countries such as Germany and The Netherlands for example limited the amount of those who could come in and work while they properly organise their own labour market.  Countries like Sweden which has a better organised labour market allowed them in. Britain a much disorganised labour market also allowed then in. Today, there are more a million people from Eastern Europe living in the country and more are still coming.

Earlier, British companies and employers had called on the government to rethink its capping policy and that such a cap will kill British business competitiveness. But others such as migration watch argue that British businesses like foreign workers because it is easy for them to be exploited rather than that they are better worker than the British workers.

On the whole most of the British immigrants come from within the EU and except the Eastern European migrants  have to be capped, the question of capping non EU migrants might instead kill the economy rather than helping it. Some authorities have call on a rigorous revolution of the immigration system rather than stopping skills flowing into the country.
By Scancomark.se Team


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