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Britain unleashes its full attitude of persecution as Cameron evict thugs from homes

Saturday, 13 August 2011
British Prime Minister, David Cameron has thrown his support to British municipal plans to evict thugs, especially those who participated in the recent street rioting and their families from government-subsidized housing. Does this makes any sense at all?

In business school lectures and courses, we were given the notion that when in a crisis, one should remain calm and take in deep breaths and relax. In this way, real good and rational decisions would be taken such that the crisis would not turn to disaster.

After the crisis, the British public has been shouting that all those involved in it should be locked up in a can and forgotten for ever. Actually, the idea that those involved in the crimes should be evicted from local council owned homes was started on the internet and several thousand of people signed the petition that local government should evict tenants from local government homes. The questions now should be whether those in their own privae homes will also be evicted or soemthing or is britian strengthening its two tier system further?

Some councils, such as Westminster have vowed to evict any body found guilty but some people have started asking  about what the council would do with those who are evicted. What will they do with children in those families who will be made homeless? 
Already a family who child goes involved in the disorder in Wandsworth, south London has been issued an eviction decision with eviction letter. The ground for this is that the family supposed to control its children.

David Cameron says in an interview with BBC News that it would be a way to "enforce accountability in society."
When asked if there would be problems for these families  Cameron respond:
“They would have thought of that before they went out to plunder. Too long have we had a soft attitude towards the people who loot and destroy their own society. If you do, you should lose the right to social housing,” says Cameron.



For Cameron, there is no room for a second chance to these poorer sectors of the society even though he gave his press secretary, Andy Coulson who was involved in hacking people’s telephones to generate news for the then  newspaper, News of the world, a paper that finally go closed down after intense pressure from the public.  Eventhough though Mr. Coulson was guilty of commiting the crime, the Prime Minister went ahead to employ him to work for his governement and said then that "he was given a second chance"

 
Andy Coulson finally stepped down as Prime Minister David Cameron's communications director in January, blaming the continuing row over phone hacking, saying it was difficult to give the "110 percent" he needed in the role.

The questions here is  why is the British public and the Prime Minister David Cameron not giving these rioters a second chance – though not condoning their actions but giving then the required punishment and letting them rehabilitate. Why step in to the poorer lower class sector to  and their families into chaos? Why one rule for some and another for others?
 
The Prime Minister also argues that more evictions could be a method to break up the criminal gangs. Cameron's move has support among the posts in the government forum on the web. The most common requirement is that the convicted rioters will lose their subsidies. Over 100,000 people have signed up to that claim.


The opposition Labour Party has criticized, however, the tough stance and believes that more evictions would hardly solve any problems, but instead creates new ones.

The inability of the British psyche, a high society that runs the country to understanding its people or society’s  need is very worrying and time and again British is not seen as a place were meaningful example can be taken to help solve social problems as well as political engagement.

Punishments, just as could be seen in many British colonies as well as the creation places such as Australia just show how hard Britain has been with its people. In teh developed Europe, there is no place were people are thrown to jail more that in the UK and as sad as it may look, ethnic minorities are thrown to jail more often that others.

“Punish the criminals very hard and others will learn the lesson” has hardly solved any crimlinla problems in the British society.   Otherwise there wouldn’t have been any criminal in this country.


The government can’t allow families to control their children, with welfare official knocking at doors to take children from families on small complaints; schools can’t be allowed to discipline children who are unruly without the teacher being accused of lack of class control. in the public transport it is possible to see kids getting out of control and fearful grown ups watching because engaging with unruly kids will lead to the accusation of battering a child.

Families will do two three job to support themselves and as such with no child care the children are left alone. They may join gangs because parents are not there to supervise them. If these parents don’t work, they care called ‘scroungers’ sponging from the system.

Britain is views out side as a place where political and economic vies for growth by emerging countries as well as other bigger economies can get to structure their socio-political structures.   The past week has not shown that and countries don’t want to learn how to sift the rich from the poor and punish or pardon them differently when they commit a crime.
By Scancomark.se Team


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