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Far rights, Sweden Democrats adopt the new policy program and shift ideologically to a less radical "Social Conservative"

Sunday, 27 November 2011
The far right Swedish political party, the Sweden democrats seem to have learnt nicely a lot for their first time in parliament. Probably, what they might have learnt is that to be racist or too radical against other ethnic groups will not lead them any where. As such they are trying to improve their image and to tone down their hard line rhetoric on ‘race mixing’.

The worry is if this will give them more support from those who voted them in the first place and which propel them to the parliamentary position. Th fear is that those hard line racists will just move on to the more dangerous and more radical party, the National democrats. That will be a matter to wait and see.

Back to the Sweden democrats though, in their meeting held recently in Gothenburg, there was a protracted vote to decide that the party should be termed as "social conservative."
It took quite a long time for the members to be convinced that this was a good route that would keep them in national governance.  Sweden Democrats had been debating the proposal for a new policy program for two days in the congress.

The program includes a proposal for a new ideological principal in which the name should be "social conservative."
“This program strengthens our middle position in Swedish politics,” said party leader Jimmie Åkesson.

The idea met intense criticism from member and such critical agent went up on the podium after Åkessons and claimed that the policy application be recalled. Joakim Larsson of Uppsala, for example, explained that he is above all a nationalist.

“I am sorry that there is no possibility to make individual amendments, so I have no alternative but to claim denials,” he said.

There was also concern that the party should go to the right.
“I do not think that social conservatism will solve all problems. I think there is a risk that there will be more "conservative" than "social" and it concerns me that come a bit from the left,” said Axel W. Karlsson from Gothenburg.

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Magnus Olsson, Mayor of Malmo supported the principle of the program and said that the party must grow in order to put an end to the "gangster culture that emerged in Malmo because of mass immigration."

Stefan Lundkvist, Uppsala, thought the party should aim to get 51 percent of the votes in future elections. “If we adamantly cling to a vague nationalism we risk permanent status on the relatively low levels we have been in the past few years,” he said.

In the old program, the name democratic nationalist is the core value. Many Sweden Democrats are critical to let nationalism as the main indication.

Program author, Mattias Karlsson assured the Congress that nationalism will always be an important starting point, “but we need to complete the whole thing. Nationalism does not answer all the questions,” he said.

Party leader, Jimmie Åkesson in his speech devoted a large part of his address to the Congress to attack Prime Minister, Fredrik Reinfeldt. He pointed out that Reinfeldt in an interview published in the Swedish daily, Sydsvenskan recently attached supporters of the Sweden democrats as looser and lonely people who want to intoxicate and drag other Swedish people along with them.
The Prime Minister believes that the Sweden Democrats voters are people who feel like losers and outsiders of the community.

“As long as you express a barely concealed contempt for ordinary people, so you will lose,” said Akesson.
“We do not belong to the losers. We have friends, job and children, we pay taxes. We are normal people with normal opinions and we belong to the future.”

The Social Democrats is also annoyed that the government ignores them and “barely mentioned them in a speech.”
He acknowledge that “there is not much evidence to suggest that he, (the prime minister) and I will sit in a room and negotiate on how to run the country.”
By Scancomark.se Team



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